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Around the world, public and private utilities alike are preparing to invest in the next generation of nuclear-powered electricity generation plants, with approximately 140 plants being planned worldwide. With increasing concern about the impact that burning fossil fuels has on the environment, particularly in terms of global warming, nuclear power is getting a fresh look by many as an environmentally conscious alternative to coal and oil plants. However, many of those utilities are wary of investing the tens of millions of dollars it takes to build those plants until they can be assured of a reliable supply of the uranium that fuels them. “If you look at the supply and demand curve, even before those new plants come online, there is a significant shortfall coming due on uranium,” says Santoy Resources president Ron Netolitzky. “A lot of plants already in existence are operating on stockpiles and those stockpiles have been drying up. Given the capital costs of building those new plants, the power companies are demanding a secure supply going forward.” Not surprisingly, the price for a pound of uranium has soared in recent years from a low of around $10 to more than $100 per pound. October 07 Businessexcellence 47 SantoyResources