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Businessexcellence September 07 20 After major gains from its effective lean program, KUDU Industries has enjoyed spectacular sales growth. That’s a challenge in itself, says vice president and chief operating officer, Matthew Kenna

September 07 Businessexcellence KUDU Industries 21 In the first issue of this magazine, back in November 2006, Matthew Kenna, vice president and chief operating officer of KUDU Industries, a company specializing in complete progressing cavity pump (PCP) systems for the oil industry, told me how KUDU had first encountered lean thinking, and how lean had subsequently revolutionized its management of inventory and secured major gains in productivity. But the story doesn’t end there. If it did, it would still be a great story, but people who really understand lean tend to talk of it as a journey. They don’t talk about “getting there,” they talk about moving forward and continuing to make progress. So it is at KUDU Industries, and so we feel that a second installment, looking at KUDU’s lean development over the last nine months, is entirely justified. If you didn’t catch the first article, you need to know that when Matt Kenna joined KUDU as financial controller in 1998, the company had $13 million of inventory, but still suffered stock outs almost every day. Kenna declared war on inventory and reduced it by over 50 percent.