page 1
page 2
page 3
page 4
page 5
page 6
page 7
page 8
page 9
page 10
page 11
page 12
page 13
page 14
page 15
page 16
page 17
page 18
page 19
page 20
page 21
page 22
page 23
page 24
page 25
page 26
page 27
page 28
page 29
page 30
page 31
page 32
page 33
page 34
page 35
page 36
page 37
page 38
page 39
page 40
page 41
page 42
page 43
page 44
page 45
page 46
page 47
page 48
page 49
page 50
page 51
page 52
page 53
page 54
page 55
page 56
page 57
page 58
page 59
page 60
page 61
page 62
page 63
page 64
page 65
page 66
page 67
page 68
page 69
page 70
page 71
page 72
page 73
page 74
page 75
page 76
page 77
page 78
page 79
page 80
page 81
page 82
page 83
page 84
page 85
page 86
page 87
page 88
page 89
page 90
page 91
page 92
page 93
page 94
page 95
page 96
page 97
page 98
page 99
page 100
page 101
page 102
page 103
page 104
page 105
page 106
page 107
page 108
page 109
page 110
page 111
page 112
page 113
page 114
page 115
page 116
page 117
page 118
page 119
page 120
page 121
page 122
page 123
page 124
page 125
page 126
page 127
page 128
page 129
page 130
page 131
page 132
page 133
page 134
page 135
page 136
page 137
page 138
page 139
page 140
page 141
page 142
page 143
page 144
page 145
page 146
page 147
page 148
page 149
page 150
page 151
page 152
page 153
page 154
page 155
page 156
page 157
page 158
page 159
page 160
page 161
page 162
page 163
page 164
page 165
page 166
page 167
page 168
page 169
page 170

any category there are a halfdozen to a dozen players, he says, “and we want to continue to differentiate ourselves from the ‘allothers’ and get closer to the big guys, so that we have a real opportunity to play the market. Generally, the majority of companies go out and conquer retail, then fi ll in the gaps with everything else, whereas we see that retail’s a great market, but it’s expensive, with thin margins, so if we can do some fl anking by developing our other categories and create awareness for our brand, and demand for our product, then we can continue to methodically grow our retail alongside. “And so,” he continues, “whereas fi ve years ago I said, in so-many years here’s where we want to be, continually out-pacing the market, growing our share as a percentage of everybody else, and delivering innovation in a way that differentiates us from the rest of the players—today, based in the central US, we literally have a distance to go to get that done.” Distribution is not a problem. They use several third party haulers that have “stepped up to the plate” to partner with them and put equipment in place to handle ice cream, which takes different equipment than freezing— so delivery operates as a well oiled machine. The St. George facility has an excellent transportation infrastructure to minimize delivery costs to west coast regions. “But what drives this to the next level,” he says, “is the fact that we’re all getting squeezed for margins; the level of competition is stiffer. There was a time that quality was a defining point of difference, which was great because you could margin up a bit, but quality’s pretty much a cost of entry now. And there’s pressure in the marketplace—you can only price so far, which means you have to work internally to get your costs down. The challenge is to couple better forecasting with getting leaner in operations. Years ago if your forecasting wasn’t very accurate, you covered November 07 Businessexcellence 45 WellsDairy As long time providers of consistently high quality aseptic fruits/fl avors, Fruitcrown has a special relationship with Wells Dairy, fostered through our exclusive association with our technical sales partners, Brotech. The combination of Fruitcrown’s outstanding products/service and economics, together with Brotech’s unique cultured dairy product know-how and technical expertise is unbeatable, providing the best value available in the industry to Wells. Fruitcrown Products Corp.