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month view of the business that is as accurate as possible. Product coordinator (process step 12) The project team leaders complete the monthly project status reports for each of their projects with input from the project teams and submit them to the product coordinator. He/she consolidates the inputs from all of the project team leaders in preparation for the product management review (PMR). The product coordinator also evaluates the inputs received from all of the project team leaders. With the primary focus on any item coded yellow or red, the product coordinator must assure that the required supporting information for these items is included. The product coordinator then prepares the presentation for the PMR, briefs the PMR owner, and attends the PMR. Product management review (process step 13) 10 www.bus-ex.com May 08 © Oliver Wight Figure 4 © Oliver Wight Figure 5

The product management review (PMR) is the first step of the monthly S&OP process (Figure 7). Its objective is to reach consensus on the status of projects and address the issues that affect their status. The goal is to keep projects on-scope, onbudget and on-schedule. A typical agenda for the PMR includes: • Review of open action items and decisions required • Review of key performance indicators (KPIs) • Review of the proposed product plans, which include: (i) Summary project status report and key milestone status report (ii) Rough cut capacity planning (RCCP), bottleneck resources, and (iii) Rolling 24-month volume, revenue and margin data with supporting assumptions • Issues to communicate to the demand, supply & finance organization May 08 www.bus-ex.com 11 Strategicmanagement • Review decisions made and the action items previously assigned • Review critique. Conducted effectively, the PMR will result in the development and implementation of valid and achievable launch plans containing supporting assumptions that are based on the approved business strategy. Conclusion This product management four-part series has highlighted the 13-step product management process that provides a systematic approach to selecting and managing products to be phased-in and phased-out of the product portfolio, which is guided by the strategic intent and profit objectives of the business. Effectively executing this process will help to ensure that a business has the products to acquire and retain customers in a profitable way. © Oliver Wight Figure 6 © Oliver Wight Figure 7 Donald McNaughton, an Oliver Wight principal, is a consultant and educator providing guidance on the design and implementation of effective business processes, including sales and operations planning and product management.