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carry the daytime energy into the evening. By using alternative energy, we can document how much we’re saving, and we’re generating carbon credits that we can sell, so we’re entering the carbon credit trading market. And we’re heading toward total self-sufficiency by the end of 2008. Up to now LACCD has been spending $12 million annually on energy; we’re going to reduce that to zero.” As he entrenches himself into fulfi lling this expansion program for LACCD, Eisenberg’s political acuity and common-sense approach, combined with his purchasing, facilities, and construction experience, equip him well for the task. “There are 455 buildings across our colleges; our new program will touch almost every building with some sort of renovation, and we’re constructing more than 40 new buildings, so it’s pretty exciting.” May 08 www.bus-ex.com 57 budget, was for furniture, so he developed specs that included things like making the furniture as much as possible out of recycled material, as well as it being 100 percent recyclable, so that it eventually could be broken down into recyclable parts. He asked for and got a fi ve-year lock-in on the pricing, and a 15-year fully unlimited warranty, as well as design and installation included. “Currently, we’re two and a half years into our furniture contract, and our pricing is way below market value for attractive, durable, sustainable products.” He used a similar strategy for manufacturing and purchasing carpeting. He’s done extensive research into the use of alternative energy sources, and LACCD’s target has gone from 10 percent to 100 percent, using solar cells, wind power and geothermal ground-source heat. “Our peak classroom time is 7:00 pm, so we needed to LosAngelesCommunityCollegeDistrict

Sustainability is nothing new to the University of Pittsburgh; Joe Fink lets Gary Toushek know that it’s been a priority for more than a decade Already 58 www.bus-ex.com May 08 The University of Pittsburgh’s roots go back to 1787, when it was founded as Pittsburgh Academy, a private school that evolved into the Western University of Pennsylvania in 1819, then the University of Pittsburgh in 1908. It became a public institution in 1966 and today has its main campus in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh, as well as regional campuses in Bradford, Greensburg, Johnstown and Titusville. An institution with that much history naturally has a variety of older buildings as well as newer ones that were added over the decades to accommodate an ever-increasing enrollment (today Pitt has more than 30,000 full-time day students). Joe Fink, associate vice chancellor for facilities management, is in charge of maintaining 59 buildings that occupy about 6 million square feet on 132 acres of university property. He there