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The project also includes a large pumping station that delivers wastewater to the treatment plant and a new outfall in Puget Sound. These facilities are being constructed by Kiewit Pacifi c and Triton Marine Construction, respectively. Kolb- Nelson says that while the seven years between the fi rst discussion of adding a plant and the start of construction seems like a long time, the work done to build consensus and gather input has paid off in the form of a more robust project. " In some ways having people voicing opposition to a project can be an asset. It can be hard for an agency or its engineers to see everything when they are so close to a project. Sometimes it takes an outside perspective to shed light on some of the things a design team may have missed. In this case, the outside view actually did contribute to a better project for everyone involved." area, and that had to be taken into account in the design of the structures as well." Work began in 2006 and is now under way on all components of the project. Hoffman Construction and Kiewit Pacifi c are the general contractors on the treatment plant, with the engineering fi rm CDM providing construction management oversight. The facility itself involves two separate contracts, one to erect the process facilities that will treat wastewater and a second to handle odor control and a solids- treatment process that will include reclaiming methane gas as a secondary power source. Kenny/ Shea/ Traylor, Vinci/ Parsons RCI/ Frontier- Kemper, and JayDee/ Coluccio/ Tasei are the three contractors building the tunnel sections of the project. Construction management for the conveyance system is provided by Jacobs. King County ' s Brightwater Treatment Facility 130 October 08 www. bus- ex. com

N October 08 www. bus- ex. com 131 North American Development Group orth American Development Group ( NADG) has been in the business of developing retail centers for more than 30 years and over that time has had a hand in developing, redeveloping or acquiring some 17 million square feet of retail and related space. Based in Markham, Ontario, the company moved into the United States in the late 1980s, fi rst building and acquiring projects in Florida and more recently expanding into markets in Texas, Arizona and Colorado. Though the company's focus remains squarely on its historic expertise in retail development, Keith Regan learns how North American Development Group's comfort level with more complex projects has helped it add some innovative developments to its portfolio Areputation forinnovation