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16 www. bus- ex. com June 09

Basil Read W ith the Football World Cup only a year away, individual players, national teams, football fans, businesses and communications companies around the globe are gearing up for the 2010 extravaganza celebration. In South Africa, however, the preparations to host the world's biggest single- sport event have been under way for almost five years, more or less since the moment on 15 May 2004 that FIFA's president, Sepp Blatter, announced that the aptly named " Rainbow Nation" had won the bid to host the games. Pressure has been mounting on South African authorities and businesses tasked with providing the all- important infrastructure for the games. Nine cities around the country were chosen as venues, and they began preparing a total of 10 international- sized football stadiums. Five of these are to be complete new builds, while the remaining five are existing stadiums that are being upgraded. One of the companies feeling the pressure is Basil Read, June 09 www. bus- ex. com 17 theball On Chris Erasmus tells Gay Sutton how Basil Read is bucking the trend and going through a period of expansion, boosted by work for the 2010 World Cup and South Africa's investment in infrastructure