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time, the new profession of industrial design was taking form with the establishment of the Bauhaus School of Architecture and Industrial Design in 1925 in Germany. Many of this discipline's practitioners sought work in the US and the other industrial giants such as Germany and England. While much of the early work was concentrated on furniture and other household goods, a venturesome core of these pioneers of field became interested in automotive and industrial/ agricultural equipment. French- born Raymond Loewy established his design office in New York in 1929, and was known for his locomotive designs, International Harvester tractors, and Studebaker automobiles. Henry Dreyfus was originally a set designer, but established his own office in 1929 and became involved in product design. He later became the designer of John Deere agricultural vehicles. Another 20 years or so later, many manufacturers were beginning to hire designers as full- time employees in an effort to cut their costs and have their designer available at a moment's notice, and so the internal design department was born. In some industries these departments have grown to hundreds of designers. Generally, industrial vehicle design groups, whether internal or external have remained relatively small and often focused on this product category. My personal introduction to industrial vehicle design came in 1968, during a University of Illinois industrial design class tour of the Caterpillar Technical Center and their internal Industrial Design department. The department had been started some 10 years earlier by Bill Smart, a UofI graduate, and the visit proved to be a real eye opener for this young design student. Most impressive however was the scale, complexity, and sheer machismo of the products " Henry Dreyfus was originally a set designer, but he established his own office in 1929 and became involved in product design"

themselves; huge dozers, wheel loaders, mining trucks, and lift trucks. Eight months later, I was working for the company. In the four years I spent there, I was involved in many new products including the 994 wheel loader concept, an on- road truck concept, and a new line of small construction loaders and bulldozers as well as many advanced concepts, some of which are still in the works. Following a stint at Ford Motor Company, working on the first all stamped steel agricultural tractor cab and various trucks, including the predecessor to the mini van, and a panel version of the ubiquitous Pinto, I ended up at International Harvester, in Chicago. That relationship lasted nearly 10 years and produced production vehicles such as the 50 series tractor, and advanced concepts such as the Probine protein harvester. However, IH was slipping into trouble, and the writing on the wall. Montgomery Design International ( MDI) was established in 1983, based on a proposal to IH management that we set up an independent consultancy, and contract back to the company for industrial and graphic design services. For the next twenty years, MDI held major responsibility for the industrial design, product styling, and product graphics for most of the IH, and CaseIH product lines, and following a merger which formed CNH, the New Holland product lines. Products developed during this period included all three versions