page 1
page 2
page 3
page 4
page 5
page 6
page 7
page 8
page 9
page 10
page 11
page 12
page 13
page 14
page 15
page 16
page 17
page 18
page 19
page 20
page 21
page 22
page 23
page 24
page 25
page 26
page 27
page 28
page 29
page 30
page 31
page 32
page 33
page 34
page 35
page 36
page 37
page 38
page 39
page 40
page 41
page 42
page 43
page 44
page 45
page 46
page 47
page 48
page 49
page 50
page 51
page 52
page 53
page 54
page 55
page 56
page 57
page 58
page 59
page 60
page 61
page 62
page 63
page 64
page 65
page 66
page 67
page 68
page 69
page 70
page 71
page 72
page 73
page 74
page 75
page 76
page 77
page 78
page 79
page 80
page 81
page 82
page 83
page 84
page 85
page 86
page 87
page 88
page 89
page 90
page 91
page 92
page 93
page 94
page 95
page 96
page 97
page 98
page 99
page 100
page 101
page 102
page 103
page 104
page 105
page 106
page 107
page 108
page 109
page 110
page 111
page 112
page 113
page 114
page 115
page 116
page 117
page 118
page 119
page 120
page 121
page 122
page 123
page 124
page 125
page 126
page 127
page 128
page 129
page 130
page 131
page 132
page 133
page 134
page 135
page 136
page 137
page 138
page 139
page 140
page 141
page 142
page 143
page 144
page 145
page 146
page 147
page 148
page 149
page 150
page 151
page 152
page 153
page 154
page 155
page 156
page 157
page 158
page 159
page 160
page 161
page 162
page 163
page 164
page 165
page 166
page 167
page 168
page 169
page 170
page 171
page 172
page 173
page 174
page 175
page 176
page 177
page 178
page 179
page 180

By Alan Ponsford and Owen Evans, Capoco The red double- deckers that patrol the streets of England's capital are set for a style makeover V ehicle design is central to all modern public transport systems and also to its users. A recent design competition, organized by Transport for London ( TfL), had the title " A New Bus for London". It has been a fairly unorthodox approach to the development of a new vehicle to replace the old Routemaster bus, but one that has attracted global media coverage. Since being founded in 1977, Capoco Design has carried out commercial bus and coach design projects all around the world. To date, the company has been responsible for more than 100 bus and coach design projects around the world. Examples include a new coach for Greyhound in North America and more than 20 new vehicles in both Asia and Africa. In the UK, Capoco's designs have been market leaders for close to 20 years. The TfL contest received more than 700 entries from all around the world. There were 11 winners in the formal design section, with the top prize being shared between Capoco Design, and a joint entry from Fosters+ Partners, the international architects, and Aston Martin. Again a striking width and depth of expertise had been drawn into this contest to develop a new bus design. www. tfl. gov. uk/ anewbusforlondon The right approach Another interesting reflection that has emerged during the competition, and resultant discussions, was the comparison of vehicle design to the design of the built environment. In the architectural world, it is standard practice to hold design competitions A new bus for

for major new buildings. Again a search of these past prize winners delivers an almost endless list of famous locations and equally famous architects. Not all of the designs are built, but clearly this competitive process is attractive to everyone, for developing the emerging designs for our cities. The Capoco design concept for the New Bus for London project was to combine the best of the old with the best of the new. So the basic layout was inspired by the famous original. This approach retained the familiar face of the existing bus, with hopefully more character than so many new buses. The new ingredients were full accessibility provided by the low floor and entrance ramp, while the power source was advanced by more than 60 years to minimise both energy use and emissions. The new bus design was based on a 10m- long double deck vehicle. The width was maximised, at 2.55m, to give the best internal space. Likewise the height was set at 4.20m to give good headroom clearances on both lower and upper decks. Moving with the times Two doorways were used, one at the front and one at the back of the lower saloon. The forward door was closed using conventional doors and contained a ramp to allow wheelchair access. The rearward door was open, offering the same open platform design as seen on the original Routemaster. The total passenger capacity was set at 80, with 66 seated and 14 standing. The lower saloon incorporated an open space at the for London