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Finished clay model Fast- forward a couple of days and some sleepless nights, and the ground effects in clay really starting to take shape. The clay's finish had to be smooth and slick to create perfect moulds. The Mocata Autosports team got busy applying mould release to the front fascia, rear bumper, and side skirt splash moulds. The mould release will allow the new fibreglass parts to be separated from the splash moulds. The saturated fibreglass cloth was then draped onto the front fascia and worked onto the surface splash moulds' contour surface using a small pin roller, eliminating any air bubbles. The entire front fascia was covered with two laminated- layers of fibreglass cloth that actually makes up the splash moulds backing. The front fascia was completely coated and all of the air bubbles were removed. The splash mould on the facia was allowed a day to cure. After pulling the splash moulds from the modified front fascia, a new part was then made and pulled from the splash mould. The fresh white gel- coated front fascia part was then aligned and mounted onto the Flex's front end. On delivery of the freshly painted and polished front fascia from the paint booth, it was aligned and mounted, and the transformation was complete. THE VEHICLE REVIEW more information? click here!

I n the highly competitive auto ndustry, increasingly it is design that differentiates a vehicle from its rivals and manufacturers are under continual pressure to accelerate design development. Design is inherently an iterative process. As a vehicle design matures; increasing levels of feasibility are introduced and the ' master model' shifts from physical clay to virtual CAD with frequent refinement of the vehicle form. So what can be done to accelerate the design process? Feature- Based modelling For years, Mechanical Design has used parametric software that stores commands ( such as Extrudes and Blends) as features in the Part History. This allows users to quickly generate and modify data via rules or parameters. Until now, it has been widely perceived this approach is not practical for the creation of freeform organic shapes found in automotive-surface design. Historically vehicle surface data has been designed on specialist stand- alone software with changes to the vehicle form resulting ON the surface By Simon Alford, Siemens PLM Software How feature- based modelling can speed automotive design