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A ' Hands- on' experience Surface modelling is not an exact science, it's a hands- on experience. Designers only begin to ascertain the subtly of forms once they start overlaying surfaces. As a model matures, the surface data continually changes as designers move boundaries to achieve the required transition between surfaces. Feature-based modelling naturally lends itself to this iterative practice. The combination of features, parameters, and associativity provide continuous feedback throughout the process. To capture design intent, users typically import styled sketches ( in the form of raster images) or STL facet data for reference geometry. NX T Industrial Design software gives designers freedom to choose the best tools for the task using a hybrid modelling approach for Class- A surfacing ( typically Bezier) and conceptual workflows ( typically Nurbs). Surfaces are generated using a combination of curve- based ( sweeping or lofting), freeform ( surface and curve " control point" editing) and surface solid modelling techniques ( a Boolean ' solid' model from a 2D Sketch). Designers can also incorporate 2D sketches to create geometric forms - often found in vehicle interior design. Class- A design is synonymous with very highest levels of quality and the capability to diagnose and validate surface quality is critical. This includes Engineering and aesthetic properties such as legal constraints, manufacturing criteria and surface curvature, highlights and reflections. Furthermore comprehensive visualization tools are required to evaluate optical appearance and support the design review and model sign- off process. NX models can be rendered in real- time, animated in a virtual environment and photo-realistic renderings generated using high dynamic range imaging ( HDRI) to provide a level of realism appropriate for marketing purposes. THE VEHICLE REVIEW more information? click here! Feature- based modelling enables rapid change of the ' Styled Blend' and ' Silhouette Flange' ` features without lengthy model re- work Curvature continuous surfaces ( G3 continuity) ensure superior surface quality results

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