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Aaron Oil Company 52 www. bus- ex. com August 09 The recession has put a lot of competitors either out of business or in a weakened position. " This has enabled our business to grow at a faster rate that we had projected," notes Cowart. He adds that he plans to double volumes within the next few years and that the company's willingness to continually invest in technology and improvements will make this possible. The average man on the street might conceive the used- oil business to be a dirty enterprise. But Cowart is quick to point to the elements of greenness and energy conservation inherent in the business. " Green initiatives are big today, as is talk about conserving energy and fi nding new sources of energy. But these are things that we've been doing for almost 30 years. We're taking waste materials, keeping them from entering the environment, and recycling them into viable products." over 300 million gallons a year are dumped by do- it- yourself people changing their own oil and doing other kinds of projects," Cowart reports. " This is equivalent to 30 Exxon Valdez oil spills a year, so it's a huge and widespread problem." Cowart is involved with a variety of agencies to expand the collection of used oil produced by do-it- yourself people so that this oil is kept out of the environment and is disposed of properly. Because of the nature of the business, Aaron Oil recognizes the urgency of developing sophisticated wastewater processing techniques. " We were one of four companies that the EPA selected to help establish the Centralized Wastewater Treatment standards because they noticed we were using the best available technology to do this," Cowart says. The company was also recognized twice in Inc. magazine's list of the top 5,000 fastest- growing companies in the country, in 2007 and 2009.

Deepwater Wind August 09 www. bus- ex. com 53 with forceto bereckoned A Preparation for the construction of the US's first offshore wind farm is moving forward quickly. Chris Wissemann talks to Gay Sutton about getting the right technology and the art of winning battles before they begin This first ground- breaking- or perhaps I should say, sea- parting- project is modest. Its eight wind turbines will be sited off Block Island inside the three- mile state jurisdiction limit and will supply almost 30 megawatts of power to Rhode Island. Though small compared with the large commercial offshore wind farms of the future, it is very much a US prototype. " This first offshore wind farm will fulfill a number of important functions. For the people locally, it proves the concept that offshore wind " T here is a breakthrough that is necessary in the US," says Chris Wissemann, managing director and founder of Deepwater Wind, the company that is set to build and operate the US's first offshore wind farm. " There is no one- no man in the street, no regulator or politician- who really knows what an offshore wind farm looks like. Very few of us have traveled the wind farms in Europe and know them first hand."