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OneLogix November 09 www. bus- ex. com 157 in various markets. " One approach is to look for small margins on large volumes of business- we are focused on doing the reverse," says Lourens. " We like to operate in markets we can reasonably expect to dominate, and in which there are comparatively high barriers to entry." They say a quick recovery from a wrong turning is the mark of a true entrepreneur; and the figures show that the direction taken by OneLogix is a sound one. The group continued to make a profit in the year to May 31 2009, and though these were down by some 11 per cent on the previous year, revenues went up by the same amount, from R512.5 million to R568.9 million. Most importantly, Lourens says, the businesses held or improved their market share. Wherever possible, he likes the founding entrepreneur to continue to run the business- nobody knows it better, or has as much motivation to scale it up. At first glance, it is tempting to call OneLogix a diverse group. It operates in clusters, Lourens explains: specialised logistics, the distribution of magazines and newspapers, and PostNet, the international franchise Lourens brought to South Africa that was the group's strongest performer last year. The hardest- hit sector in the period, not surprisingly, was automotive and that impacted directly on VDS ( Vehicle Delivery Services), which delivers cars to dealerships throughout the SADC region using its 210 trucks and trailers. With offices in Harare and Lusaka as well as a network of bases in South Africa, it has contracts to deliver the vast majority of marques, and has gained market share because of its quality. " The main competitive advantage of VDS is the online track- and- trace capability we have and none of our competitors can offer. This has allowed us to gain market share over the last five years. Just as important, it has softened the blow of the recession: the private vehicle market in South Africa fell by up to 35 per cent, whereas our profit was down just 10 per cent." With about 30 per cent of the market in South Africa itself and 90 per cent of cross- border car deliveries, VDS is doing well and operating on good margins, he