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12 www. bus- ex. com January 10 Continuous chain

Supply chain management January 10 www. bus- ex. com 13 Continuous Natural disasters, customer bankruptcies, product recalls... there are dozens of unexpected events that can wreak havoc on your worldwide supply chain. Are you prepared to react swiftly to these contingencies? A continuous supply chain design process can help you to succeed when faced with even the worst ' what- if' scenarios, says Hal Feuchtwanger N early every major retailer, manufacturer and distributor has learned the value of comprehensive long- term supply chain planning. Whether they are looking at a two, three or five year horizon, most executives can tell you what they expect their supply chains to look like in the future. They have top- level financial goals, as well as detailed plans for constructing new facilities, broadening their distribution networks, partnering with new suppliers, launching innovative products and other key supply chain activities. But what happens when these carefully constructed plans go awry? Is the average company equipped to succeed in the face of a severe supply chain disruption such as a hurricane, work stoppage or transport shutdown? What about the dramatic demand falloff caused by a product recall or a game- changing competitor innovation? design supply chain